What an Austrian Ducat is worth

Many collectors wonder what an Austrian Ducat is worth. It is important to first understand what an Austrian Ducat coin actually is. The Ducat became a popular world traded coin. It was first introduced in the late 13th Century. However, it was the Venetians who introduced the coin.

Austrian Gold Ducats are large gold coins valued by investors for several reasons. First of all for their 98.60% fineness weighing 3.44 grams. Secondly, these circulated coins were the highest purity gold coins to be issued prior to the late 20th Century. Therefore, during the 1400s international traders in Western Europe changed from using florins to ducats as the preferred currency.

It is important to note, Ducats come it different sizes in different countries in Western Europe. Today one gold ducat would be worth around 150 dollars. Although, it depends on the current price of gold per ounce. Plus, larger sized Ducats are worth more. For instance, the 4 ducate weight is 13.9636 grams. That is slightly 4 times more than a single Ducat.

It is important to note, The Austrian Mint has been producing innovative coinage and currency for over 800 years. This make it one of the oldest continuously-producing minting institutions in the world. Due to their high purity and exceptional design these coins obtain a high price. Of course, this depends on the condition. Nevertheless, holding a piece of history from the Austria-Hungary Empire in any condition is a great addition to one’s collection. It is no wonder why these impressive coins are so sought after.

Rare Austrian Double Ducat

This rare Austrian Double Ducat weighs almost twice as much as a single Ducat at 7.02 grams. Featured on the obverse is Saint Rupert of Salzburg. As a matter of fact, Rupert is the patron saint of the state of Salzburg, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Salzburg. On the reverse is a central shield with ornate detail.

Today commemorative Ducats are still being minted. The Hungarian mint still mints commemorative coins with 2, 3, 4 and 6-ducats quality. Netherlands still issues golden and silver ducats having the same weight, composite and design when they were first minted in 1586. Indeed, these Ducats are still very popular all over the world.

So when someone asks you what an Austrian Ducat is worth you should be able answer. It would have to depend if you are talking about a single Ducat or a 2,3,4, or 6 ducat quality. To find out more be sure to contact a World Coins Advisor at Austin Rare Coins & Bullion.

Alexander the Great Conquered Babylon

The Persian Achaemenid Empire ruled Babylon for about two hundred years. They were the first super power of the ancient world. Their vast empire reached from India down to Egypt and all the way up to the northern border of Greece. The Achaemenids were an unstoppable force until Alexander did the unthinkable. Alexander the Great conquered Babylon and defeated the Achaemenids in 331 BCE. Alexander’s actions change the entire ancient world.

Alexander learned to be a great leader and powerful imperialist from his father Philip II. He also learned to be a battle strategist. Moreover, he knew what the odds would be against an outmatched manpower. But, despite the odds Alexander relied on speed and distraction to achieve victory after victory. Subsequently, Alexander the Great conquered Babylon giving his army a huge decisive victory. A success that gave him the confidence and the momentum to continue marching on towards the east.

Babylon was Alexander the Great’s greatest conquest and “to the victor belong the spoils.” Giving proof to the proverb that the winner is entitled to all of the rewards, bonuses, and benefits of success. Consequently, Alexander’s troops and generals needed to share in those spoils. The spoils that included hoards of gold coins minted by the Persians.

Alexander melted down the Persian coins to re-mint gold double darics. He kept the same Persian features of a kneeling king or hero holding a bow and spear on the front of the coin. This was done in homage and respect of the mighty Persians. However, it was also propaganda to prove that the mighty Macedonian army were not only the victors, but also a generous new leader.

Babylonian Gold Double Daric

Alexander the Great’s gold double daric struck in Babylon is one of the true rarities of the Alexander the Great Series. Upon Alexander’s invasion of central Asia, darics and double darics melted down and recoined as coins of Alexander are quite rare today. To clarify, only a handful of them even exist.

Double darics are far more difficult to find than the regular gold darics. To find a double daric today that commemorated Alexander the Great conquered Babylon is a newsworthy occurrence. This is a very important coin dating back over 2,300 years and is a rare find in any condition.

Gold Cobs are The Original Doubloons

Spanish Colonial gold coins salvaged from the 1715 Fleet off the east coast of Florida are called Gold Cobs. Gold Cobs are the original Doubloons. Therefore, the Doubloon is a solid gold coin. Even though the Spanish called their gold coins Escudos, Doubloon became the nickname for a two Escudo coin. In addition, the word Doubloon is actually taken from pirates calling these two Escudos “double-one,” which turned into “Doubloon.”

As commerce increased between North America and South America so did the need for coins. Spanish Gold Cobs were minted from the early 1600s to the early 1800s. They were minted in Bolivia, Chile, Columbia, Guatemala, Mexico, and Peru and were circulated as far north as Canada. Pirates sought after these Gold Cobs. Because, Gold Cobs are The Original Doubloons. In fact, they would attack and sink Spanish Colony ships just to get their gold. As a result, coins circulating freely during the colonial period of the New World, became easy targets.

1718 Peruvian 8 Escudo

Check out this absolutely remarkable gold coin in the video below. It’s a Peruvian gold 8 Escudo that was struck in Lima Peru in 1718. Additionally, it is one of only 4 coins like this certified by NGC in all grades combined. Above all, it is the finest known and certified in Mint State. This coin contains just about an ounce of pure Spanish gold.

The obverse shows the pillars of Hercules with ocean waves below it and a tick-tac-toe imagery of letters and numbers signifying when and where the coins was made. This 1718 Peruvian 8 Escudo has a Jerusalem Cross on the reverse with castles and lions in the four corners. Coins like this are extremely desirable for collectors and investors. This is one of the finest we have ever seen.

If you are interested in finding out more about this coins and others like it check out this page or call and talk to a Rare Coins Advisor at Austin Rare Coins at 1-800-928-6468.

Three-Dollar Gold Piece

The rarest pre-1933 US gold coin is the Three-Dollar gold piece. To clarify, only 539,792 of them were produced according to the US Mint. The reason there were so few made is because the Three-Dollar gold coins were very unpopular. Basically, the public rejected them when they were introduced in 1854. Therefore, only small mintages of these coins were produced from 1854 to 1889. Similarly, They ended production after just 35 years. This total of just over half a million coins were produced at the US Mint facilities in Philadelphia, New Orleans, San Francisco and Dahlonega combined.

Many of these 3 Dollar coins have been destroyed or lost throughout the years. Trying to find them at any condition can be difficult as very few are in existence today. Take the coin in the video below for example. This $3 princess was struck in New Orleans in 1854. No other $3 coins were issued with the O Mint mark. These coins are definitely rare and desirable in any condition. Only a total of 24,000 of them were struck and only around 1,500 of them have been certified in all grades combined!

3 Dollar Gold Piece Design

The Three-Dollar gold piece was designed by James B. Longacre, and for the first time he had been allowed to choose his own design. In the past, James had always been directed as to what design to use. Longacre decided to create something truly American. He wanted to represent America with a female Native American, or Indian princess, dating back to the 16th century. For example, the image of the Indian princess survived in the popular view of figures such as Pocahontas and Sacagawea. In addition, the US Mint issued the Sacagawea Golden Dollar from 2000 to 2008.

On the reverse of the Three-Dollar gold piece you’ll find a wreath comprised of tobacco, wheat, corn, and cotton. In addition, it encircles the date and the words 3 Dollars. You can find out how to purchase 3 Dollar coins for your own collection at Austin Rare Coins & Bullion!

Rare Ancient Roman Coins To Own

Rare Ancient Roman Coins to own date back over 2,000 years. They have become very popular. Many investors and collector are anxious to collect and own them today. Holding something that was around so long ago is a feeling like no other. A base of collectors from all over the world have evolved. They enjoy putting together collections of ancient coins that they find very special, enjoyable, and potentially highly profitable.

Of course, not all Ancient Coins are as rare as others. Truly rare Ancient Roman Coins are far and few between. Ever Increasing demand puts pressure on the extremely limited supplies. Those in excellent condition, that only have a smaller number known to exist, are ones to own. The most desirable are worth the most money.

One of the most famous ancient coins is the Ides of March Denarius. It has a rich history of Brutus’s assassination of Julius Caesar. Only 80 specimens are known to exist in the world today. Simply put, there are far more collectors wanting to own one than there are coins in existence. Therefore, it is not uncommon to find a multiple six figure price tag for such a coin.

Reasons to Own Rare Ancient Coins

  1. Ancient coins are portable, private stores of wealth.
  2. They have very limited supplies and a growing demand from investors and collectors.
  3. Ancient coins are non-reportable and non-confiscatable.
  4. Ancient coins unearthed overseas are being seized by Dept. of Antiquities, limiting future supplies in the marketplace.

If you’re interested about learning more about Ancient Roman Coinage you should request a free copy of our 8 page Ancient Coin Report. Call 1-800-928-6468 and talk to an Ancient Coin Advisor at Austin Rare Coins & Bullion. They’re more than happy to assist you in finding the exact Ancient Roman Coins that you are looking for.

What is the largest ancient gold coin?

Many customers ask us, “What is the largest ancient gold coin?” We tell them, you’ve come to the right place! Only one ancient gold coin struck holds that title. The Gold Octodrachm was by far the largest gold coin ever struck in the ancient world. These heavy weights were a most common denomination of its day. Importantly, other large denominations like the tetradrachm (four drachms), the pentadrachm (five drachms) were also common. However, the Octodrachm (an eight-drachm coin) was the largest.

Gold Octodrachms were struck over 2,300 years ago. They were produced during the Hellenistic period in Ptolemaic Egypt. No other kingdom or empire in the ancient world comes close to producing such a large gold coin. Above all, Ancient Egypt was known to be a country of remarkable wealth and prosperity. The Ptolemaic Empire displayed their economic clout by drawing thousands of mercenary soldiers into Egypt’s service.

Egyptian Gold Octodrachms were struck in different designs during the many different reigns. In particular, the coins paid homage to their leaders. For instance, a Dynastic Octodrachm, depicts the founders of the dynasty. It features Ptolemy I and his wife Berenice I on the reverse of the coin. The obverse shows portraits of Ptolemy II and Arsinoe II.

Ptolemy II Gold Octodrachm

Each Octodrachm contains just under an ounce of pure gold. This represented an enormous amount of wealth for a person who lived in Ancient Egypt. Today, collectors are impressed with the remarkable designs and craftsmanship of these coins. For a 2,300 year old coin they look absolutely stunning. The Ptolemy II Gold Octodrachm example, in the video below, has been graded by NGC Ancients. Furthermore, it is in Choice Very Fine condition. This makes it affordable to some collectors. A mint state example however, would be far too expensive for most coin enthusiast.

So, when someone asks you, what is the largest ancient gold coin is? You can tell them that it is call the Gold Octodrachm. In conclusion, you can say that one in perfect condition would be way out of their reach! Except, maybe in a museum.

What is a Gold Aureus?

A gold coin of ancient Rome

What is a Gold Aureus? The Julius Caesar Gold Aureus was a gold coin of ancient Rome originally valued at 25 pure Silver Denarii. From the 1st century BC to the beginning of the 4th century AD the aureus was commonly struck. It later was replaced by the Solidus. This gold Aureus was struck Caesar during the Roman Republican period under Julius Caesar by Praetor A. Hirtius.

The aureus was heavier than the same size denarius because gold is more dense than silver. Before Julius Caesar became emperor of Rome the gold aureus wasn’t very common. It was Caesar’s extravagant spending and trying to gain favor with the social elitist that led to the aureas becoming more popular.

Caesar becomes the first emperor

Instead of gaining favor, Caesar’s populist and authoritarian reforms angered the elites. In fact, after Caesar centralized the bureaucracy of the Republic he made sure that he would be proclaimed “dictator for life.” Not the best way to please the social elite and this of course led to the demise of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire.

It also led to Caesar’s demise in 44 BC on the 15th of March, the Ides of March. This day which was was famously dramatized in William Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar. The 15th of March corresponds with the 74th day In the Roman calendar. The day that was notable as a religious observances day for Romans to settle all debts. Ironically, it became notoriously known as the date of the assassination of Julius Caesar. It was a major turning point in Roman history.

History in your hands

As you can see holding a Julius Caesar Gold Aureus is like holding a piece of history. On this Gold Aureus the head of Vesta is shown on the obverse. The priestly equipment adorns the reverse. This is a simply remarkable Julius Caesar Gold Aureus in Choice Very Fine Condition. It has also been awarded very high marks of 5 for Strike and 4 for Surfaces from NGC. This coin is hard to find in any condition!

The first Roman Emperor, Julius Caesar, is still known around the world over 2,000 years after his demise. Collecting and owning a gold stater that has seen circulation in the past makes you wonder just whose hands actually have touched it. Who knows, maybe even Julius Caesar himself. Something to ponder when you look at such a beautiful and historical remembrance of Ancient Rome. Now when someone asks, what is a Gold Aureus? You know at least one fine example with a great story!

How much is a Roman Aureus worth?

Ancient coins are beautiful, miniature works of art, and true antiquities. In order to understand how much is a Roman aureus worth, you have to understand that ancient coins are amazingly rare. There is a very limited supply and a growing demand from investors and collectors.

You don’t need a fortune to acquire a truly rare and beautiful ancient coin. There are many different types. But, In order to really understand a Roman Aureus’ worth you have to know how rare it is. You also have to know what the condition it is in. And, you have to know how many people want to own it.

The 3 basic principles the affect cost of ancient coins

The rarity of a coin is basically determined by these three different principles: 1) How many of a particular coin survived and are still in existence. 2) Whether the coin is in perfect condition or not so perfect. The higher the perfection the more rare and desirable the coin will be as a general rule. 3) Last but not least, how many people want to own one. It is the driving force that can make something extremely valuable.

A Roman Gold Aureus issued under Roman Emperor Augustus, as seen in the video below, is worth a lot. An example like this costs around $20,000 if it is genuine and certified by NGC. NGC is the only true Ancient Coin Authentication and Grading Service. NGC developed a specialized grading system for ancient coins. They grade a coin’s state of wear and give a detailed explanation of the coin’s appearance.

Augustus Gold Aureus are rare because they are hard to find. In fact, we have never seen or held one in any condition. They are also rare because of their spectacular quality and how centered they are by a measured strike.

Augustus Gold Aureus

Obverse: CAESAR AVGVSTVS between two laurel trees.
Reverse: CIVIS SERVATOS in three lines within an oak wreath.

Are Roman coins worth anything?

When it comes to ancient Roman coins investors always ask, are Roman coins worth anything? Well today, that depends on quality, rarity, and other important factors. For example, eye appeal, artistic merit, historical significance, and precise state of preservation. These are things to consider before you buy any Ancient coin.

A gold aureus was worth 833⅓ denarii in 301. By 324, the same aureus was worth 4,350 denarii. Ancient coins appreciate in time. Mainly, due to the demand of a finite quantity that can be found.

As noted on our Ancient Gold Coins Website:

  1. Ancient coins are beautiful, miniature works of art. In other words, true antiquities.
  2. Overall, ancient coins are amazingly rare.
  3. Ancient coins are portable, private stores of wealth.
  4. Owning ancient coins is a wise decision. Because, they are very limited in supply with a growing demand from investors and collectors.
  5. It is also important to note that Ancient coins are non-reportable and non-confiscatable.
  6. In addition, you don’t need a fortune to acquire truly rare and beautiful ancient coins.

Ancient Tiberius Gold Aureus

However, some very rare coins can cost 5, 6, and sometimes even 7 figures. With this particular coin, are Roman coins worth anything? is a loaded question. This Ancient Tiberius Gold Aureus, Certified by NGC in Choice Extremely Fine 5×4 condition is worth over $11,000. There are certain historical reasons that this coin is so rare and so desired.

Tiberius ruled the Roman Empire from 14-37 AD. His reign was during the life and death of Jesus Christ. Coins bearing his likeness are very desirable. Particularly, when in such a fine state of preservation. This unique coin is well centered and struck with originality and lots of eye appeal. Great coin for the money and a classic rarity from ancient Rome.

If this coin or other Roman Empire coins strike you interest, talk to one of our Ancient Coins Dealers. They can offer great advice and sound knowledge in the Ancient Rare Coins Market.