Last Province of Canada

Many people today are not aware that Newfoundland was independent and its own Dominion. Today, Newfoundland is the last province of Canada. This means it was the 10th and last province added. However, it was formerly known as the Newfoundland Colony. It wasn’t until after World War II that it became a province of Canada. In fact, on March 31, 1949, it was easternmost, the tenth, and last province to be added to Canada.

Before it became a Canadian province, Newfoundland was called the “Dominion of Newfoundland.” Back in 1907 Newfoundland along with its neighbor Labrador enjoyed the constitutional status like other dominions of the time. This was confirmed by the Balfour Declaration of 1926 along with the Statute of Westminster of 1931.

Newfoundland’s independence only survived for 79 years. This was because of severe economic hardship during the Great Depression. Apparently, Newfoundland accumulated a significant amount of debt due to the building of a railway across the island. Consequently, in 1934, Newfoundland had to surrender its independence to the British Empire. They decided to give up self-government and suspend their own constitution. This allowed the United Kingdom to take over guardianship.

World War II

The persistent worldwide Great Depression lasted until World War II broke out in 1939. Newfoundland became a strategic World War II location. Above all, it was important for the Battle of the Atlantic. Once the United States entered the war, they found the strategic need to deploy military bases on Newfoundland. In fact, the U.S. rapidly injected a lot of American money and influence to quickly build American military, naval, and air bases. 

The new found support from the U.S. led to close ties, which led to a new Economic Union Party. This close union was a short-lived because Canada and the British Allies denounced the union. Nevertheless, Newfoundland seemed too small to be independent and needed financial help. It only had a population of 313,000 not counting the 5,200 on Labrador.

London realized that something needed to be done. A union and annexation with the United States seemed like a distinct possibility. So in 1945, Britain decided to allow Newfoundlanders to make their own decision by giving them the choice to vote on their future by referendum. Canada assisted and cooperated with Britain to help prevent America from getting any closer.

It was a tough decision for Newfoundlanders to choose between confederation or Dominion status. In short, after a close vote of 52 to 48 percent Newfoundland decided to band together with Canada. Therefore, Newfoundland is the tenth and last province of Canada.

1865 $2 Newfoundland Gold Piece

Below is a video that has a two-dollar gold coin that was struck in Newfoundland in 1865 when it was its own dominion. Today, Newfoundland is the last province of Canada. However, this coin was from an extremely low mintage of only 10,000 coins—way before it became united with Canada.

It’s the first year of issue of the series that issued sporadically from 1865 to 1888. In addition, it has been graded by PCGS in one grade shy of mint state. Above all, it is a wonderful coin and seemingly undervalued in the current marketplace.

Gold Cobs are The Original Doubloons

Spanish Colonial gold coins salvaged from the 1715 Fleet off the east coast of Florida are called Gold Cobs. Gold Cobs are the original Doubloons. Therefore, the Doubloon is a solid gold coin. Even though the Spanish called their gold coins Escudos, Doubloon became the nickname for a two Escudo coin. In addition, the word Doubloon is actually taken from pirates calling these two Escudos “double-one,” which turned into “Doubloon.”

As commerce increased between North America and South America so did the need for coins. Spanish Gold Cobs were minted from the early 1600s to the early 1800s. They were minted in Bolivia, Chile, Columbia, Guatemala, Mexico, and Peru and were circulated as far north as Canada. Pirates sought after these Gold Cobs. Because, Gold Cobs are The Original Doubloons. In fact, they would attack and sink Spanish Colony ships just to get their gold. As a result, coins circulating freely during the colonial period of the New World, became easy targets.

1718 Peruvian 8 Escudo

Check out this absolutely remarkable gold coin in the video below. It’s a Peruvian gold 8 Escudo that was struck in Lima Peru in 1718. Additionally, it is one of only 4 coins like this certified by NGC in all grades combined. Above all, it is the finest known and certified in Mint State. This coin contains just about an ounce of pure Spanish gold.

The obverse shows the pillars of Hercules with ocean waves below it and a tick-tac-toe imagery of letters and numbers signifying when and where the coins was made. This 1718 Peruvian 8 Escudo has a Jerusalem Cross on the reverse with castles and lions in the four corners. Coins like this are extremely desirable for collectors and investors. This is one of the finest we have ever seen.

If you are interested in finding out more about this coins and others like it check out this page or call and talk to a Rare Coins Advisor at Austin Rare Coins at 1-800-928-6468.

Alexander The Great Silver Drachm

Alexander The Great Silver Drachm in Holder

This Alexander The Great Silver Drachm is a beauty! Few names resonate in history like that of  General Alexander the Great of Macedon.  Even today 2,350 years after his death Coinage issued under Alexander are highly desirable and are sought after by all sorts of collectors.

A Silver Drachm Like this…Will Sell Quickly!

We are pleased to offer this remarkably high end silver drachm graded by NGC Ancients. Because it has been certified in choice mint state condition, it is highly desirable. It also has received the fine style designation, which implies it to be of the highest artistic quality. Furthermore, this particular coin is known to be a lifetime issue. This means it was struck while Alexander was still alive. Coins that were issued after his death are referred to as a posthumous issue. 

Front & Back of this Coin:

Alexander The Great Silver Drachm

Overall the look of this Silver Drachm is remarkable and it is hard to believe that it was struck nearly 2400 years ago. This coin’s silver is bright white, flashy, and the strike is absolutely solid. You will find the obverse depicts Hercules facing right in lifelike fashion wearing a lion skin helmet.

Alexander The Great Silver Drachm - Reverse

The reverse shows Zeus seated upon a throne holding a scepter in his left hand but an eagle is perched on his right hand. You can clearly make out the muscularity features of Zeus and the centering on the back of the coin is absolutely perfect.

Is this Coin is For Sale?

We have only one of these Alexander The Great Silver Drachms available, and expect it to sell quickly given the low price point and all of the features described above. Ancient coins are a remarkable area of the numismatic marketplace. Coins issued under famous generals or noteworthy leaders are highly desirable today—particularly those in such a remarkably high state of preservation. 

Have questions about this coin? Then be sure to call our ancient coin advisor to learn more. This type of coin is a rare find, so it would definitely be a great addition for ancient coin collectors and investors alike!

Alexander The Great Silver Drachm - Both Sides

What Persian Darics were used for.

An ancient Persian Gold Daric is a high-purity gold piece and weighs approximately 8.4 grams. This weight is based on an ancient weight standard.

The Daric was also referred to as a Babylonian shekel. It was called a shekel because it was equivalent to one month’s pay for a mercenary foot soldier. We know what Persian Darics were used for. Persian Darics were some of the first coins ever used as currency. Currency was a new concept, because in ancient times bartering was the norm.

One daric could be exchanged for 20 silver sigloi. This was a daric’s silver currency counterpart. It was a period in the ancient world that the concept of currency as trade started. Archeologist unearthed hoards of darics and sigloi from Sicily to Afghanistan. This area was all part of the former Persian Empire. It was also proof that the concept of currency spread quickly.

Unique Persian Gold Daric

Our video below shows a unique Persian Gold Daric. It is from the Achaemenid Empire, c.5th Century BC. However, it is slightly different than virtually every other Daric. There have been thousands of typical ones found. Furthermore, only recently were new coins like the one below uncovered in Turkey.

10 Gold Darics were found with a formerly unused symbol. Usually there is a king with bows, arrows, and daggers. For the very first time we see the use of a cross underneath the king.

Some PhD’s suggest it’s a crucifix. Not to symbolize Christ. Jesus Christ didn’t come around for another 400 years. These experts believe it symbolizes the mighty Persian army crucifying those who would not obey them.

Ideas are swirling! Other experts have suggested the symbol is an anchor. In addition, they believe it refers to the Persian naval fleets. In conclusion, we may never know. We do know what Persian Darics were used for. It was the first time coins were used for currency and trade. After that, we are not too sure. Most importantly, why was a cross stamped on only a few examples and only recently found.

Could the cross have been stamped to send a message to the people and was it for propaganda? These questions and discoveries are what makes ancient coins so much more fun to collect!

Ancient Electrum Coinage of Cyzicus

The first coins ever made were of a substance called electrum. Ancient Electrum Coinage of Cyzicus could be found occurring naturally along riversides in ancient times. Importantly, electrum contained gold and silver, with trace amounts of copper and other metals. It was bright and had such a white color to it that ancient Greeks who found it called it “white gold.” Moreover, there were several types of electrum depending on the amount of gold and the different alloys it contained. Electrum could range in color from a bright white yellow a greenish tone. Adding Cadmium, which is highly toxic, to the gold turned it to a green color. The ancient Lydians who discovered this also realized the health concerns regarding its use.

Cyzicus Electrum Choice Very Fine Stater

An example of a Cyzicus Electrum is this Ancient Cyzicus Electrum Choice Very Fine Stater. It is an amazing coin and desirable by many types of collectors. Firstly, this is the earliest depiction of a domesticated animal on human coinage that we know of. Secondly, it was struck around 2,550 years ago. Thirdly, this 17-gram electrum full stater depicts a hound running left in lifelike fashion. Finally, the dog is atop a totem animal, the tunny (tuna fish).

This Ancient Electrum Coinage of Cyzicus is an amazing piece of history. In other words, it is truly a rare artifact. It is also a collectors item. One to put away and relish. Above all, having one of the first coins ever made is of historical value.

In conclusion, starting in 650 B.C electrum coins were coins ever made. The material they use for the coins was a naturally occurring mixture of gold and silver found in and around streams and riverbeds.

If you’d like to own this amazing piece of history it is a tough item to beat. We love the value found in the earliest of all coinage: electrum. Talk to one of our Rare Coin Advisor to purchase this coin, or other like it. The coin shown is the exact coin you will receive.

Cyzicus Electrum Stater ‘Hound on Tunny’ NGC CHVF 4×4