What an Austrian Ducat is worth

Many collectors wonder what an Austrian Ducat is worth. It is important to first understand what an Austrian Ducat coin actually is. The Ducat became a popular world traded coin. It was first introduced in the late 13th Century. However, it was the Venetians who introduced the coin.

Austrian Gold Ducats are large gold coins valued by investors for several reasons. First of all for their 98.60% fineness weighing 3.44 grams. Secondly, these circulated coins were the highest purity gold coins to be issued prior to the late 20th Century. Therefore, during the 1400s international traders in Western Europe changed from using florins to ducats as the preferred currency.

It is important to note, Ducats come it different sizes in different countries in Western Europe. Today one gold ducat would be worth around 150 dollars. Although, it depends on the current price of gold per ounce. Plus, larger sized Ducats are worth more. For instance, the 4 ducate weight is 13.9636 grams. That is slightly 4 times more than a single Ducat.

It is important to note, The Austrian Mint has been producing innovative coinage and currency for over 800 years. This make it one of the oldest continuously-producing minting institutions in the world. Due to their high purity and exceptional design these coins obtain a high price. Of course, this depends on the condition. Nevertheless, holding a piece of history from the Austria-Hungary Empire in any condition is a great addition to one’s collection. It is no wonder why these impressive coins are so sought after.

Rare Austrian Double Ducat

This rare Austrian Double Ducat weighs almost twice as much as a single Ducat at 7.02 grams. Featured on the obverse is Saint Rupert of Salzburg. As a matter of fact, Rupert is the patron saint of the state of Salzburg, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Salzburg. On the reverse is a central shield with ornate detail.

Today commemorative Ducats are still being minted. The Hungarian mint still mints commemorative coins with 2, 3, 4 and 6-ducats quality. Netherlands still issues golden and silver ducats having the same weight, composite and design when they were first minted in 1586. Indeed, these Ducats are still very popular all over the world.

So when someone asks you what an Austrian Ducat is worth you should be able answer. It would have to depend if you are talking about a single Ducat or a 2,3,4, or 6 ducat quality. To find out more be sure to contact a World Coins Advisor at Austin Rare Coins & Bullion.

Gold Cobs are The Original Doubloons

Spanish Colonial gold coins salvaged from the 1715 Fleet off the east coast of Florida are called Gold Cobs. Gold Cobs are the original Doubloons. Therefore, the Doubloon is a solid gold coin. Even though the Spanish called their gold coins Escudos, Doubloon became the nickname for a two Escudo coin. In addition, the word Doubloon is actually taken from pirates calling these two Escudos “double-one,” which turned into “Doubloon.”

As commerce increased between North America and South America so did the need for coins. Spanish Gold Cobs were minted from the early 1600s to the early 1800s. They were minted in Bolivia, Chile, Columbia, Guatemala, Mexico, and Peru and were circulated as far north as Canada. Pirates sought after these Gold Cobs. Because, Gold Cobs are The Original Doubloons. In fact, they would attack and sink Spanish Colony ships just to get their gold. As a result, coins circulating freely during the colonial period of the New World, became easy targets.

1718 Peruvian 8 Escudo

Check out this absolutely remarkable gold coin in the video below. It’s a Peruvian gold 8 Escudo that was struck in Lima Peru in 1718. Additionally, it is one of only 4 coins like this certified by NGC in all grades combined. Above all, it is the finest known and certified in Mint State. This coin contains just about an ounce of pure Spanish gold.

The obverse shows the pillars of Hercules with ocean waves below it and a tick-tac-toe imagery of letters and numbers signifying when and where the coins was made. This 1718 Peruvian 8 Escudo has a Jerusalem Cross on the reverse with castles and lions in the four corners. Coins like this are extremely desirable for collectors and investors. This is one of the finest we have ever seen.

If you are interested in finding out more about this coins and others like it check out this page or call and talk to a Rare Coins Advisor at Austin Rare Coins at 1-800-928-6468.

Why buy a Coson Gold Stater?

This Beautiful Ancient Coin

If some asks “why buy a Coson Gold Stater” you can answer, because you’re looking for remarkable ancient coins. One that is gold and has tremendous value in the ancient coin market place. You can also tell them to just take a look at this beautiful ancient coin. Then show them the Coson Gold Staters in Mint State 4×4 Condition.

Some Coin Highlightsv

  • These coins have a quarter of an ounce of pure gold and were struck around 2,000 years ago.
  • They are certified by NGC, a branch of Numismatic Guaranty Corporation devoted to ancient coins.
  • They are in mint state condition and for under $2,000.

What is on these coins?

The obverse of this coin depicts 3 soldiers in procession and is very impressive. On the reverse you’ll find an intricate design of an Eagle holding an Olive wreath, so both sides are incredible.

Is this the only one?

These coins are newly acquired and we have 3 available. If you are interested and you have any questions just give us a call. You can also go directly to the website page to purchase one of these.

Some great views of this coin:

Collectors always love to own what other people can’t have.

Quality, rarity, and price are the most important factors to consider before you purchase any beautiful Ancient Coin. Other factors are also important like eye appeal, artistic merit, historical significance, and precise state of preservation, so buyer beware.

The Ancient Coin Market has been hot in the last few years and moving into what we believe is a bull market cycle. At any point in time, certain beautiful Ancient Coins may be performing very well while other areas may be quiet. That’s why it’s important to talk to an Ancient Coin Advisor at Austin Rare Coins.

Some collectors will prefer to focus on the hottest areas of the market while investors may be “value seekers” looking for the best quality coins. So when someone asks you, why buy a Coson Gold Stater? You can say because Austin Rare Coins has some great offers on them. Whatever beautiful Ancient Coin you desire… it should be the best deal and bang for the buck.

For all the facts on the history of the Ancient Rare Coin market, order our free Ancient Coins Buyer’s Guide today!

What is a Gold Aureus?

A gold coin of ancient Rome

What is a Gold Aureus? The Julius Caesar Gold Aureus was a gold coin of ancient Rome originally valued at 25 pure Silver Denarii. From the 1st century BC to the beginning of the 4th century AD the aureus was commonly struck. It later was replaced by the Solidus. This gold Aureus was struck Caesar during the Roman Republican period under Julius Caesar by Praetor A. Hirtius.

The aureus was heavier than the same size denarius because gold is more dense than silver. Before Julius Caesar became emperor of Rome the gold aureus wasn’t very common. It was Caesar’s extravagant spending and trying to gain favor with the social elitist that led to the aureas becoming more popular.

Caesar becomes the first emperor

Instead of gaining favor, Caesar’s populist and authoritarian reforms angered the elites. In fact, after Caesar centralized the bureaucracy of the Republic he made sure that he would be proclaimed “dictator for life.” Not the best way to please the social elite and this of course led to the demise of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire.

It also led to Caesar’s demise in 44 BC on the 15th of March, the Ides of March. This day which was was famously dramatized in William Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar. The 15th of March corresponds with the 74th day In the Roman calendar. The day that was notable as a religious observances day for Romans to settle all debts. Ironically, it became notoriously known as the date of the assassination of Julius Caesar. It was a major turning point in Roman history.

History in your hands

As you can see holding a Julius Caesar Gold Aureus is like holding a piece of history. On this Gold Aureus the head of Vesta is shown on the obverse. The priestly equipment adorns the reverse. This is a simply remarkable Julius Caesar Gold Aureus in Choice Very Fine Condition. It has also been awarded very high marks of 5 for Strike and 4 for Surfaces from NGC. This coin is hard to find in any condition!

The first Roman Emperor, Julius Caesar, is still known around the world over 2,000 years after his demise. Collecting and owning a gold stater that has seen circulation in the past makes you wonder just whose hands actually have touched it. Who knows, maybe even Julius Caesar himself. Something to ponder when you look at such a beautiful and historical remembrance of Ancient Rome. Now when someone asks, what is a Gold Aureus? You know at least one fine example with a great story!

Ancient Electrum Coinage of Cyzicus

The first coins ever made were of a substance called electrum. Ancient Electrum Coinage of Cyzicus could be found occurring naturally along riversides in ancient times. Importantly, electrum contained gold and silver, with trace amounts of copper and other metals. It was bright and had such a white color to it that ancient Greeks who found it called it “white gold.” Moreover, there were several types of electrum depending on the amount of gold and the different alloys it contained. Electrum could range in color from a bright white yellow a greenish tone. Adding Cadmium, which is highly toxic, to the gold turned it to a green color. The ancient Lydians who discovered this also realized the health concerns regarding its use.

Cyzicus Electrum Choice Very Fine Stater

An example of a Cyzicus Electrum is this Ancient Cyzicus Electrum Choice Very Fine Stater. It is an amazing coin and desirable by many types of collectors. Firstly, this is the earliest depiction of a domesticated animal on human coinage that we know of. Secondly, it was struck around 2,550 years ago. Thirdly, this 17-gram electrum full stater depicts a hound running left in lifelike fashion. Finally, the dog is atop a totem animal, the tunny (tuna fish).

This Ancient Electrum Coinage of Cyzicus is an amazing piece of history. In other words, it is truly a rare artifact. It is also a collectors item. One to put away and relish. Above all, having one of the first coins ever made is of historical value.

In conclusion, starting in 650 B.C electrum coins were coins ever made. The material they use for the coins was a naturally occurring mixture of gold and silver found in and around streams and riverbeds.

If you’d like to own this amazing piece of history it is a tough item to beat. We love the value found in the earliest of all coinage: electrum. Talk to one of our Rare Coin Advisor to purchase this coin, or other like it. The coin shown is the exact coin you will receive.

Cyzicus Electrum Stater ‘Hound on Tunny’ NGC CHVF 4×4