What is a Gold Aureus?

A gold coin of ancient Rome

What is a Gold Aureus? The Julius Caesar Gold Aureus was a gold coin of ancient Rome originally valued at 25 pure Silver Denarii. From the 1st century BC to the beginning of the 4th century AD the aureus was commonly struck. It later was replaced by the Solidus. This gold Aureus was struck Caesar during the Roman Republican period under Julius Caesar by Praetor A. Hirtius.

The aureus was heavier than the same size denarius because gold is more dense than silver. Before Julius Caesar became emperor of Rome the gold aureus wasn’t very common. It was Caesar’s extravagant spending and trying to gain favor with the social elitist that led to the aureas becoming more popular.

Caesar becomes the first emperor

Instead of gaining favor, Caesar’s populist and authoritarian reforms angered the elites. In fact, after Caesar centralized the bureaucracy of the Republic he made sure that he would be proclaimed “dictator for life.” Not the best way to please the social elite and this of course led to the demise of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire.

It also led to Caesar’s demise in 44 BC on the 15th of March, the Ides of March. This day which was was famously dramatized in William Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar. The 15th of March corresponds with the 74th day In the Roman calendar. The day that was notable as a religious observances day for Romans to settle all debts. Ironically, it became notoriously known as the date of the assassination of Julius Caesar. It was a major turning point in Roman history.

History in your hands

As you can see holding a Julius Caesar Gold Aureus is like holding a piece of history. On this Gold Aureus the head of Vesta is shown on the obverse. The priestly equipment adorns the reverse. This is a simply remarkable Julius Caesar Gold Aureus in Choice Very Fine Condition. It has also been awarded very high marks of 5 for Strike and 4 for Surfaces from NGC. This coin is hard to find in any condition!

The first Roman Emperor, Julius Caesar, is still known around the world over 2,000 years after his demise. Collecting and owning a gold stater that has seen circulation in the past makes you wonder just whose hands actually have touched it. Who knows, maybe even Julius Caesar himself. Something to ponder when you look at such a beautiful and historical remembrance of Ancient Rome. Now when someone asks, what is a Gold Aureus? You know at least one fine example with a great story!

How much is a Roman Aureus worth?

Ancient coins are beautiful, miniature works of art, and true antiquities. In order to understand how much is a Roman aureus worth, you have to understand that ancient coins are amazingly rare. There is a very limited supply and a growing demand from investors and collectors.

You don’t need a fortune to acquire a truly rare and beautiful ancient coin. There are many different types. But, In order to really understand a Roman Aureus’ worth you have to know how rare it is. You also have to know what the condition it is in. And, you have to know how many people want to own it.

The 3 basic principles the affect cost of ancient coins

The rarity of a coin is basically determined by these three different principles: 1) How many of a particular coin survived and are still in existence. 2) Whether the coin is in perfect condition or not so perfect. The higher the perfection the more rare and desirable the coin will be as a general rule. 3) Last but not least, how many people want to own one. It is the driving force that can make something extremely valuable.

A Roman Gold Aureus issued under Roman Emperor Augustus, as seen in the video below, is worth a lot. An example like this costs around $20,000 if it is genuine and certified by NGC. NGC is the only true Ancient Coin Authentication and Grading Service. NGC developed a specialized grading system for ancient coins. They grade a coin’s state of wear and give a detailed explanation of the coin’s appearance.

Augustus Gold Aureus are rare because they are hard to find. In fact, we have never seen or held one in any condition. They are also rare because of their spectacular quality and how centered they are by a measured strike.

Augustus Gold Aureus

Obverse: CAESAR AVGVSTVS between two laurel trees.
Reverse: CIVIS SERVATOS in three lines within an oak wreath.